Getting full bottle

By Liz Trevaskis

Boobs. They are miraculous things. One day they’re just taking up space on your chest, the next (if the next day you deliver a baby of course …) they are a life-giving force, filling with the magical elixir of breastmilk, to nourish a new tiny human.

A simple, natural thing that our bodies – our boobies – are designed to do, after we give birth (those amongst us with the relevant anatomy, that is).

Although, as I’m sure you know, rarely is anything that simple. Continue reading “Getting full bottle”

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Not bottles or tubes…just boobs

By Sarah Lockie

Breastfeeding my second baby has been…easy. When my obstetrician came to see me in hospital when she was a few days old, I said, “It’s so easy it doesn’t seem real, you don’t hear women talk about this kind of breastfeeding experience.” He replied, “It feels unkind to talk about it, doesn’t it? When so many women struggle.” (Did I mention my obstetrician is an amazing human?)

And so I thought about whether telling this story was kind, or reasonable, but I thought about another piece of advice which came from a midwife friend: the bad birth stories are the ones you hear, because those women need to talk – but seek out the good birth stories, because that’s what you need to focus on during pregnancy. So I’m offering my ‘good’ breastfeeding story, because it’s good to hear these stories too. Continue reading “Not bottles or tubes…just boobs”

The thing that helped the most…

By Liz Trevaskis

What’s the one bit of advice, the thing that helped the most, the one thing you wished you had known, or the one thing you’d go back and tell yourself… to help you through the first few weeks and months of breastfeeding?

The one bit of advice that helped me the most, came from my GP. She always said “the only two things that matter are that your baby is putting on weight – and your mental health.”  Continue reading “The thing that helped the most…”

The one thing that really helped…

The one thing that really helped during the early weeks and months of breastfeeding, by Kate Calacouras.

After my second child Edie was born, I had an amazing lactation consultant come to our house. I wish I had done it with Sam – we probably would have avoided so many problems.

Edie was about six days old at the time, and I was in agony.  Mastitis + nipple thrush. A terrible combination. Continue reading “The one thing that really helped…”

The one bit of advice…

The one bit of advice that got me through the early weeks and months of breastfeeding, by Gabrielle Gray.

Apply yourself to being confident in 3 ways:

First, be confident to listen to your own instincts, intuition and natural reactions to things that go on with your baby. My mum told me ‘you are built to do this’, so be confident in your ability to learn and adapt to your baby and go on your own, unique journey. Continue reading “The one bit of advice…”

I’m using formula and I feel guilty… but not for the reason you think

By Madeleine Morris

Madeleine Morris is the author of “Guilt Free Bottle Feeding”. This article originally appeared on her website in March this year. 

The guilt started on day four.  Weeping, a heart that literally hurt with pain.  As I put the bottle of formula to my beautiful new baby’s lips I felt overcome with regret.  But not for the reason you think.

I am perfectly happy to feed my new baby formula.

The aching guilt I feel is for not feeding my first baby formula sooner.

Continue reading “I’m using formula and I feel guilty… but not for the reason you think”

Disappointment – and success

By Bonnie Steer

I was disappointed following my daughter’s birth.

My husband and I had done the Calmbirth course and I had really wanted that natural birth experience. Especially since my husband’s twins, who were eight at the time I was pregnant, were born via emergency C-section. However at 38 weeks and four days my blood pressure was too high, and as I was already taking blood pressure medication, it was decided that I should be induced.

After five hours of painful induced labour my baby was in distress and I was told that I needed an emergency C-section. I was pretty sad – and also pretty terrified. Continue reading “Disappointment – and success”

Breast, bottle or….feeding tube

By Sarah Lockie

Before Euan was born, I had a vague idea that feeding tubes existed – I think I’d seen one in an article in Woman’s Day about a sick kid, and another in an anti-smoking ad – but it’s not something you envisage your own child needing. It’s not a part of the day-dreamy anticipation of what life with your baby will look like.

But not much about being the mum of an extremely prem baby is. Continue reading “Breast, bottle or….feeding tube”

Telling the truth

By Jati Wixted

I had what I would call a typical birth. In that nothing really went the way I planned. On the tenth day past my due date and after four failed inductions my “uncooperative cervix” and I unpacked the scented oils and the bikini we’d planned for the birth pool. In their place, we packed giant black knickers and pads resembling phone books, slapped on some red lippy and waddled in for a non-emergency C-section.

I was filled with stories of the trauma related to this, and of course confident in the research that showed I would now not produce milk, and that my body was in fact a bit of a simpleton when it came to its fundamental role. Continue reading “Telling the truth”

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